An (almost) double berth in the saloon.

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patentnick
Posts: 57
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:51 am

An (almost) double berth in the saloon.

Post by patentnick »

Following the construction of the dinette a few years ago, it was only a matter of time to also attempt to squeeze a double berth out of it. Most manufacturers address that issue by simply dropping the table to bunk level and filling the void with cushions. I couldn't do that because the table I had built as part of the dinette would not fit the space and I wasn't keen on making another one. Also, the table was on permanent hinges and quick removal was impossible.

After some head-scratching, I sourced two-part hinges and substituted the old ones. (I also installed a catch made of teak so that the table wouldn't slide off when underway). Next, I cut two pieces of plywood to fit the space and painted them the colour of the surrounding structure. And the lucky part was that, once removed, the table fits in the space underneath. (Incidentally, Dulux's water-based, exterior-grade paint with code "Salisbury Stones 3" perfectly matches the interior gelcoat.)

As for the in-fill cushions, I had already made backrests for the seats that would fit exactly that space.

N.
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Nicholas Koligiannis
Moments of Clarity
Hull No. 334
MarkRyan1981
Posts: 165
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 7:47 am

Re: An (almost) double berth in the saloon.

Post by MarkRyan1981 »

I like it Nicholas! Very nice indeed! Nicely finished as ever with your work.

We took a slightly different tack: http://www.albinballad.co.uk/how-tos/co ... ble-berth/
patentnick
Posts: 57
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:51 am

Re: An (almost) double berth in the saloon.

Post by patentnick »

Hi Mark:

Thanks for your kind words.

Yours is very nicely done as well. You followed the most logical path which, of course, helped to create a king-size bed--not to mention a great play area for the kids. The thinking behind my arrangement was to be able to accommodate another adult couple in a double bed, while retaining access between the saloon and the forecabin. This will be put to the test in three weeks, as we're expecting two friends to join us for a short cruise. Also, my girlfriend finds this sleeping area less claustrophobic than the V-berth.

I've noticed that your Ballad is the same version as mine, i.e. with two outboard berths and saloon settees that are as comfortable as a church bench. Several years ago, I converted the outboard berths to storage space and pushed the sides outward (beefing up the aft lower shroud chainplates in the process). Now, it's more comfortable for four people to lounge. We rarely have guests on board but it's nice to have some extra space.

Plus, with the raised dinette seats you can look straight out the windows and get that deck saloon-ish feel.

N.
Nicholas Koligiannis
Moments of Clarity
Hull No. 334
Bob McGovern
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: An (almost) double berth in the saloon.

Post by Bob McGovern »

Mark and Nicholas: Both really nice designs & executions! Many ways to approach the double berth question; we're presently scheming to use the two brass table leg sockets in the bilge to hold up a central 'spine' board, then 3/8" semi-rigid panel material inside the main cushions themselves. To make up the berth, you put the chrome posts into the sockets, mount the spine board, pull out each cushion 13" (33cm) so it rests on the spine board, then tuck the backrest cushions into the gaps created. That's the plan. ;)

BTW, Mark: enjoyed reading your 'How To' article on the Triola site. Since you have a nice heavy router, here's a tip from someone who hates routers but uses them daily: Learn to climb cut.

Climb cutting is moving the router from right to left, in the direction of the bit's spin. Especially when you have a lot of material to remove, or when you are working with a material prone to tearing out (like oak, teak, or mahogany) or burning (like maple or pine), climb cutting removes most of the waste with the leading edge of the bit swinging into the material, rather than exiting. It also tends to push the router away from the workpiece, allowing delicate, nibbly bits of stock to be removed at a time. Going left to right tends to make the router dive into the material & take too heavy a cut.

Now, you don't want to climb cut with a light router spinning a large diameter bit -- the router will tend to run at you like a maddened bull. But my practice (using an 8kg plunge router) is to climb cut lightly until ~80% of the desired material is gone, then make one last finishing pass left to right. (Best advice I ever got on routers is: Routers Go Left.) That last pass will hold the bit tight to the workpiece or template & give you a fine finishing cut. But for preliminary cuts or wasting lots of stock, I always start off with multiple, light climb cuts. It's not textbook, but it's one of those skills you learn by accident & then wish you'd known about years before. ;)
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