Galley improvements

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Nicholas Koligiannis
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:51 pm

Galley improvements

Post by Nicholas Koligiannis »

At the urging of Bob McGovern, I'm re-posting a couple of improvements I've made to the galley of "Moments of Clarity" which were first uploaded on the original Ballad Exchange. The first involves the installation of a stainless steel crash bar and vertical handhold--while avoiding to make the galley look like a strip club; and the second involves the design and installation of a metal frame around the stove top in order to protect the surrounding woodwork from errand flames. (Believe it or not, the latter is even more important for safety than the former.) The photos should be self-explanatory but please let me know if you've any questions/ comments.

Nicholas.
Attachments
A side view of the whole lot.
A side view of the whole lot.
P1020622.JPG (156.1 KiB) Viewed 10329 times
General view of the vertical pole and crash bar. (In this photo, the metal frame around the stove hasn't been installed yet).
General view of the vertical pole and crash bar. (In this photo, the metal frame around the stove hasn't been installed yet).
P1020205.JPG (167.67 KiB) Viewed 10329 times
As for the metal frame, measuring the metal sheets had to be done very precisely since I wanted to use the original mounts for the gimbals.
As for the metal frame, measuring the metal sheets had to be done very precisely since I wanted to use the original mounts for the gimbals.
P1020621.JPG (143.8 KiB) Viewed 10329 times
The top part of the pole ended up really close to the starboard clutch backing pad, so I took it off, epoxied a round base for the pole and re-installed it.
The top part of the pole ended up really close to the starboard clutch backing pad, so I took it off, epoxied a round base for the pole and re-installed it.
P1020202.JPG (158.69 KiB) Viewed 10329 times
Adding a horizontal crash bar was easier, measurement-wise.
Adding a horizontal crash bar was easier, measurement-wise.
P1020203.JPG (230.02 KiB) Viewed 10329 times
Last edited by Nicholas Koligiannis on Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Bob McGovern
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 am
Location: Wyoming, USA

Re: Galley improvements

Post by Bob McGovern »

Whoo hoo! Thanks, Nicholas! I should be less lazy & just mine the old Ballad Exchange site, but it is nice to have these photos over here.:) Excellent work. We won't be adding an oven, relying on a Dutch oven or solar oven for baking, but the flame shield is a nice touch. Do you ever use all three burners? I like the taller icebox, too: ours came with only 1mm of Ensolite foam for insulation; we have built that up to something like 12cm, inside and out, but that cut the interior volume by about half. We did not consider making it taller. Clever.

Right now, we have planned a vertical grab bar only on the port side -- the nav station will also house a composting toilet & that bulkhead will be made taller for privacy. Not sure if we should add one by the galley, too? My girlfriend finds coming down the steps unnerving, as it is a little distance to a good handhold. I just grab the companionway hatch & swing down like a monkey. :D

Also love the cane door panels. That is what we want to put in Fionn. Is your cane natural, or plastic? Someone makes a PVC cane that is tough and waterproof.

http://www.rattansupplies.com/caneweb.htm#
Nicholas Koligiannis
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:51 pm

Re: Galley improvements

Post by Nicholas Koligiannis »

Hi Bob.

We don't use all three burners very often but having them is very handy if you're cooking a bigger meal. Between having two or three burners I'll opt for three every time.

Many years ago, during Phase 1 of the galley renovation, I ripped out the old icebox and built my own fridge out of 50mm Isotherm panels. Several years later, I bought a ready-made fridge from Isotherm, increased the insulation around it and installed it around a teak frame so that it sits higher than the counter. More importantly, I constructed a new lid using theirs as a base but adding a new domestic-fridge seal and an extra 30mm sheet of plexiglass on the bottom. Now the lid is quite heavy and forms a perfect seal. The fridge is constantly on when cruising but consumes very little power--as measured by a digital amp/volt meter. (Incidentally, the single biggest job I've done on the boat is in the electrics department.)

The door panel is made of natural cane. I think the trick is to get the cane wet before positioning it on the frame; it tightens when it's dry. The reason I chose it in the first place is to provide fresh air to the fridge compressor which is installed under the sink.

Nicholas
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